daily tarot card: Five of Wands

five of wands
five of wands, morgan greer tarot

This card reminds me of struggle and strife.  It looks like a lot of people clamoring for a spot or for what they think is right.  I don’t think it’s anything violent, but as wands are the suit of fire and creativity, it brings to mind when people are excited and want their opinions and ideas heard.  How can everyone in this space be validated and given a platform?

It brings to mind, for me, situations where my partner and I don’t exactly see “eye to eye” and we need to find a middle ground in order to move forward.  We’ve done a lot of this while experiencing buying and working on our house.

A lot of times, it’s me who is loudest or most particular or wants my way.  In our relationship, I am more uptight and Andrew is more laid-back.  What I’ve learned of late is that no one person needs to be “right.”  I’ve learned things aren’t always perfect or just one thing or another.  There are grey areas and compromises that aren’t bad, but are simply a shift.

I feel this is the lesson of the five of wands: where there is clamoring and disagreement, there often needs to be a shift in focus or perspective in order to move forward.

Back to my example of our home, it means that our compromise of today is putting aside the current big project (painting the bathroom) and instead lounging with our cat, Gary, and watching all of the Lord of the Rings extended films.  It is giving ourselves space and permission to relax and enjoy and fill our cups before plunging into 2019.  It is putting aside the to do list to just be.

Relating this back to the five of wands, this does not take the focus off the bigger picture, but allows us to “live our truth” for today and simply be.


I am blogging my experiences here with Beth Maiden’s Alternative Tarot Course which asks students to draw a card each day, reflect on it, complete weekly readings, and other assorted exercises.

Tarot Thursday Three: February 16, 2017

Well, I was pretty bummed to have missed posting this week’s #tarotthursdaythree on Thursday.  I had a funky work schedule this week — worked three midnight shifts then had to switch back to the day time on Friday.  Ugh.  Needless to say my sleep patterns were a little off, which found me very sleepy on Thursday during the day and not very productive….

Anyway, here are my answers for this week’s installment of #tarotthursdaythree, hosted by Julia, and questions from me!

1.  How do you feel about the Rider-Waite-Smith (RWS)?

Basically my answer to this question inspired this set of questions.  The RWS was my first deck, but not the first one that really inspired me to learn.  (I feel like I’ve told this story a million times but now YOU GET IT AGAIN!).  I had my tarot read with a RWS deck at a Fasching/Karnival/Mardi Gras party (similar to Vanessa’s story).  My reading was done only with Majors, and I don’t even really remember what she said, but I think I got the Devil, the Hanged Man and the Tower…?  Yikes!  I was intrigued by the mysticism of tarot — I had watched this woman read strangers’ tarot all night, and everyone was impressed.  Like a good little tarot beginner, I purchased a RWS deck but ultimately put it aside for years before purchasing The Wild Unknown, which is the deck that really started my journey.

Lately, however, I’ve been connecting really well with my RWS.  Originally, I just did not connect with the RWS images.  They seemed aloof and disconnected from the daily life that I experience.  As I learned more of the card meanings, I developed a connection with the traditional symbolism of the cards.  This idea/practice is discussed also over at Julia’s and Jill’s posts.  I find that the more decks I work with, the more other decks’ images come to mind as I’m reading, particularly with the RWS, which I don’t think is bad.  This helps to remind of of the different dimensions of a particular card.  My favorite rendition is the Smith-Waite Centennial Tarot, which is just dreamy in my opinion.

Anyway, so umm yeah, lovin’ the RWS lately.

2.  What was your beginning deck?

Well, I guess I answered that above — oops!  First purchased deck was the Rider Waite Tarot Pack, but The Wild Unknown is what got me really excited to learn tarot.

3.  Do all beginners need to start with the RWS (or clone), in your opinion? Why/why not?

I am woefully under-qualified to give tarot beginners any tips….but, I would mainly recommend a beginner to look at the Rider-Waite-Smith and clones to see if they connect with any of the decks’ images.  As I know, if you’re not inspired by the art, you’re not going to be inspired to continue to learn.  If you don’t like the RWS, pick a deck that speaks to your intuition and has gorgeous art.

That being said, I feel that there are so many RWS clones that it should be easy these days to find one that a new reader can appreciate.  Furthermore, if the reader intends to make a life-long study out of tarot, starting with a RWS would be most beneficial.  So basically…..any rules here are meant to be broken *shrug*.

Well, that’s it 🙂 … I think I already linked to everyone who has done this round so far (Julia and Jill).  Let me know if you make a post and I’ll check it out!

What do you think of the RWS?  What is the ideal beginner deck in your opinion?  Let me know in the comments.

exploringly yours,
Alaina x